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John Frederick Bailyn

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Professor
Ph.D. 1995, Cornell University
Email:   john.bailyn@stonybrook.edu

John Frederick Bailyn's research involves investigations of the workings of the linguistic component of the mind, with particular attention to the Slavic languages. Within theoretical linguistics, his primary interests lie in generative syntax, especially issues of case, word order and movement. Within cognitive science, he is interested in issues of modularity, creativity, and musical perception. Within Slavic Linguistics, he is interested in Russian Syntax, Morphology, and Phonology, comparative Slavic syntax, and historical linguistics.

JFB is also the co-Director of the NY-St. Petersburg Institute of Linguistics, Cognition and Culture (NYI), St. Petersburg, founded in 2003 an entering its 18th year in 2020. 

Books
The Future of (Post-)Socialism (2018) SUNY Press. (ed with Dijana Jelača and Danijela Lugarić)
The Syntax of Russian (2012) Cambridge University Press (winner of 2013 AATSEEL prize for best contribution in Slavic Linguistics, 2012-13)
Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 19: The College Park Meeting. (2012) (ed.) (w/ Ewan Dunbar, Yakov Konrad and Chris LaTerza), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI.
Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 16: The Stony Brook Meeting. (2008) (ed.) (w/ Andrei Antonenko and Christina Y. Bethin,), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI.

Selected Articles
"The Scrambling Paradox" (in press) Linguistic Inquiry
"Bulgarian Superiority and Minimalist Movement Theory" (2018) In Y. Oseki, M, Esipova & S. Harves (Eds), Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 25. Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI:  27-49.
"Against a VP ellipsis account of Russian verb-stranding constructions" (2017). In Alexander Vovin (ed) Studies in Japanese and Korean Linguistics and beyond, BRILL: 93-109.
"Language, Music, Fire, and Chess: Remarks on Music Evolution and Acquisition" (2015). In P. Eismont and N. Konstantinova (Eds.): Language, Music and Computation, Springer, CCIS 561: 27–44.
"Kinds of Derivational Binding" (2011) in Gerhild Zybatow et al (eds) Formal Studies in Slavic Linguistics: Linguistik International, vol. 25. Frankfurt/Main: Peter Lang: 11-30.
"To what degree are Croatian and Serbian the same language? Evidence from a translation Study". (2010)
J ournal of Slavic Linguistics, 18(2): 181-219.
"What's Inside VP? New (and old) Evidence from Russian" (2010) Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 18, Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI: 21-37.
“A Derivational Approach to Micro-Variation in Slavic Binding” (2007) In Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 15: A. Savchenko et al (eds.), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI: 25-41.
"Slavic Generative Syntax" (2007) In Slavic Linguistics 2000, S. Franks, (ed.) Glossos 8: 1-54.
“Against the Scrambling anti-movement Movement” (2006). In Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 14: J. Lavine et al (eds.), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI: 35-49
"Generalized Inversion" (2004). Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 22: 1-49
"The Case of Q" (2004). In Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 12: O. Arnaudova et. al. (eds.), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI: 1-36.
"A (purely) Derivational Account of Russian Scrambling" (2003). In Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 11: B. Partee et. al. (eds.), Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor, MI: 41-62.
"Overt Predicators" (2003). J ournal of Slavic Linguistics 10/1-2 (Festschrift for Leonard H. Babby): 23-52.
"On Scrambling: A Reply to Bošković and Takahashi" (2001) Linguistic Inquiry 32/4: 635-658.

Book Reviews (selected)